Teachers quitting jobs at record high rate

    Teachers and other public education employees, such as community-college faculty, school psychologists and janitors, are quitting their jobs at the fastest rate on record, government data shows.

    As The Wall Street Journal reports, a tight labor market with historically low unemployment has encouraged Americans in a variety of occupations to quit their jobs at elevated rates.

    But quitting among public educators stands out because the field is one where stability is viewed as a key perk and longevity often rewarded.

    The departures come alongside protests this year in six states where teachers in some cases shut down schools over tight budgets, small raises and poor conditions.

    In the first 10 months of 2018, public educators quit at an average rate of 83 per 10,000 a month, according to the Labor Department. While that is still well below the rate for American workers overall—231 voluntary departures per 10,000 workers in 2018—it is the highest rate for public educators since such records began in 2001.

    The rising number of departures among public education workers is in contrast with 2009, when the economy was first emerging from a deep recession. Then, the rate was just 48 per 10,000 public education workers, a record low.

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