Ability to work remotely seen as ‘the new signing bonus’

After almost a year and a half of working from home, many white-collar employees say they are not willing to return to corporate offices full time. Even whispers of making returning a requirement have been enough to send some professionals searching for an exit—and plenty of bosses are welcoming them to new jobs with the promise they can work remotely, at least most of the time.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the push for flexibility is adding to the wave of resignations rippling through the U.S., recruiters say, and motivating many employers to reevaluate their work-from-home policies. Canadian video-software firm Vidyard says it has seen a steep increase in job applications in recent months after emphasizing that roles can be performed mostly at home. And at Allstate Corp., conversations about every new position now begin with the question: “Why can’t this be done remotely?” says Carrie Blair, the insurance giant’s chief human resources officer. “It’s a big workforce shift for us.”

Marc Cenedella, founder and chief executive of Ladders, a job-search site for roles that pay north of $100,000 a year, says greater flexibility is shaping up as a perk that companies can wield to poach talented people.

“Remote is going to be the new signing bonus,” he says. “Instead of dangling, ‘We’ll give you $10,000 if you sign for this job,’ it’ll be: ‘Instead of having to commute 35 minutes every day, go to work, and get in your car and drive 35 minutes home, you can work from your home office all the time.’” Read the full story.