Louisianans increasingly get their news from online sources, study says

Louisianans increasingly get their news from online sources, study says




The latest results from the 2012 Louisiana Survey shows that—for the first time—state residents are getting more of their news about state politics and public affairs from online sources than from print. Of the survey respondents, 22% said they turn to online sources as their top source for the news, while 14% said the same of print publications. Nonetheless, TV is still the king, though its grip appears to be loosening. While 61% last year said TV is their No. 1 choice for news, that number slipped to 56% in this year's survey. "The increase in online usage isn't surprising, but reminds us that media literacy is a potential concern in Louisiana," says Jerry Ceppos, dean of LSU's Manship School of Mass Communication. "With the proliferation of online news sources, many people don't know how to differentiate reliable sources of information from those that aren't so reliable. Sorting through the wheat and the chaff is very difficult." Not surprisingly, the survey also shows that younger respondents are more likely to identify the Internet as their primary news source. Of 18- to 24-year-old respondents, 30% cited online news as their top source, while 39% of 25- to 34-year-olds said the same. Just 6% of those age 65 and up said they turn to the Internet for their news more than elsewhere. Perhaps most disturbingly, 32% of respondents said they don't know whether the websites they use for news content are run by legitimate news organizations. The Louisiana Survey annually aims to serve as a barometer of statewide public opinion on a number of issues. The overall survey included 731 randomly selected respondents, who were polled via phone. Complete survey details, results and methodology can be found here.



comments powered by Disqus