BP calls for industry to adopt broader safety standards

BP calls for industry to adopt broader safety standards




Bernard Looney, BP's executive vice president for developments, called on the industry to adopt broader safety standards on the first day of The Offshore Technology Conference, taking place today through Thursday in Houston. "We are in absolutely no position to preach," he says. After the obligatory mentions of the Deepwater Horizon disaster and the 11 men who lost their lives in it two years ago, Looney devoted much of his speech today to talking about what the industry needs to do in response. His speech used the word "industry" more than 30 times, not counting the question-and-answer session, where he also used it liberally. This has been pretty standard fare from BP for the past two years. The oil giant continues to direct the discussion outward at the industry rather than internally at its own operations. Looney, for example, called for greater transparency, saying that's the only way to earn the public's trust. Yet until last month, the company had fought to keep thousands of documents about the safety of its Atlantis platform sealed in a long-running legal battle. Later in his comments, Looney praised new industry standards calling for deepwater wells to have two concrete barriers, without frankly acknowledging that the well the Deepwater Horizon was drilling at the time of the disaster had only one such barrier. Looney, though, is head of developments for BP, and about half his speech focused on the corporation's plans for the future. BP considered abandoning its wells in the Gulf of Mexico after the disaster, but "after much soul searching" concluded it would be wrong to walk away. Read the full story here.



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