The world remembers Steve Jobs

The world remembers Steve Jobs




Widely considered a modern-day Thomas Edison for his revolutionary inventions, Apple founder Steve Jobs is being remembered around the globe today as a man who saw the future and led the world to it. Jobs moved technology from his parents' garage to people's pockets, took entertainment from discs to bytes, and turned gadgets into extensions of the people who use them. Apple announced his death without giving a specific cause. He was 56. Jobs battled cancer in 2004 and underwent a liver transplant in 2009 after taking a leave of absence for unspecified health problems. He took another leave of absence in January—his third since his health problems began—and resigned in August. Jobs then became Apple's chairman and handed the CEO job over to his handpicked successor, Tim Cook. Apple has posted a simple message on its website about Jobs' death: "Apple has lost a visionary and creative genius, and the world has lost an amazing human being. Those of us who have been fortunate enough to know and work with Steve have lost a dear friend and an inspiring mentor. Steve leaves behind a company that only he could have built, and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple." Read more about Jobs' life and death in The Wall Street Journal here, and see a profile the newspaper did of Jobs in 1993 here. You can also find a remembrance piece by Wall Street Journal reporter Walter Mossberg titled "The Steve Jobs I knew" here. An interactive feature from The New York Times on all of Jobs' 317 Apple patents can be found here, and you can see an interactive timeline of his life here.



Today's poll question: Which of Steve Jobs' inventions do you think has changed the world the most?



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